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Posts for tag: oral health

By Elmvale Dental Care
February 22, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   oral health  
WhyGumDiseaseCouldAffectMoreThanYourOralHealth

Do you know the top cause for adult tooth loss? If you guessed tooth decay, you’re close—but not quite. The same goes if you said accidents or teeth grinding. It’s actually periodontal (gum) disease, a bacterial gum infection that affects half of American adults.

What’s worse, losing teeth could be just the beginning of your health woes. Several studies show uncontrolled gum disease could cause problems in the rest of the body. That’s why we’re promoting February as Gum Disease Awareness Month, to call attention to this potentially devastating oral disease—and what you can do about it.

Gum disease usually starts with a thin film of food particles and bacteria called dental plaque. As it builds up on tooth surfaces, bacteria multiply and lead to an infection that can spread below the gum line, weakening the gums’ attachment to the teeth.

Beyond tooth loss, though, gum disease could affect the rest of the body. Oral bacteria, for instance, can travel through the bloodstream and potentially cause disease in other parts of the body. More often, though, researchers now believe that the chronic inflammation associated with gum disease can aggravate inflammation related to other conditions like cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes or arthritis. Likewise, inflammatory conditions can worsen symptoms of gum disease and make it harder to treat.

The good news, though, is that reducing the inflammation of gum disease through treatment could help ease inflammation throughout the body. That’s why it’s important to see us as soon as possible if you notice gum problems like swelling, redness or bleeding. The sooner you’re diagnosed and we begin treatment, the less an impact gum disease could have on both your mouth and the rest of your body.

Similarly, managing other inflammatory conditions could make it easier to reduce symptoms of gum disease. You can often control the inflammation associated with these other diseases through medical treatment and medication, exercise and healthy eating practices.

You’ll also benefit both your oral and general health by taking steps to prevent gum disease before it happens. Prevention starts with a daily practice of brushing and flossing to remove dental plaque. You should follow this with professional dental cleanings and checkups every six months (sometimes more often, if advised).

Gum disease can damage your teeth and gums, and more. But dedicated dental care and treatment could help you regain your dental health and promote wellness throughout your body.

If you would like more information about preventing and treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”

By Elmvale Dental Care
February 12, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   oral health  
ThisFebruaryShowaLittleLovetoBothYourHeartandYourGums

It’s February and time for a little heart love. And not just the Valentine’s Day kind: February is also American Heart Month, when healthcare providers promote cardiovascular health. That includes dentists, because cardiovascular health goes hand in hand with dental health.

It just so happens that February is Gum Disease Awareness Month too. If that’s a coincidence, it’s an appropriate one: Although different in nature and health impact, heart disease and gum disease are linked by a common thread: chronic inflammation.

Inflammation (or tissue swelling) in and of itself is beneficial and often necessary. When cells in the body are injured or become diseased, the immune system isolates them from healthier cells through inflammation for the protection of the latter. Once the body heals, inflammation normally subsides.

But conditions surrounding both heart disease and gum disease often prevent a decrease in inflammation. With heart disease, for example, fatty deposits called plaque accumulate within blood vessels, impeding blood flow and triggering inflammation.

A different kind of plaque plays a pivotal role with gum disease. Dental plaque is a thin biofilm that builds up on tooth surfaces. It’s home to bacteria that can infect the gums, which in turn elicits an inflammatory response within those affected tissues. Unless treated, the infection will continue to grow worse, as will the inflammation.

The bad news is that these two sources of chronic inflammation are unlikely to stay isolated. Some recent studies indicate that cardiovascular inflammation worsens gum inflammation, and vice-versa, in patients with both conditions.

The good news, though, is that treating and managing inflammation related to either condition appears to benefit the other. Patients with cardiovascular disease can often reduce their inflammation with medical treatment and medications, exercise and a heart-friendly diet.

You can also ease gum disease inflammation by undergoing dental plaque removal treatment at the first signs of an infection. And, the sooner the better: Make a dental appointment as soon as possible if you notice swollen, reddened or bleeding gums.

You can lower your gum disease risk by brushing and flossing daily to remove accumulated plaque, and visiting us at least twice a year for more thorough dental cleanings and checkups. If you’ve already experienced gum disease, you may need more frequent visits depending on your gum health.

So this February, while you’re showing your special someone how much you care, show a little love to both your heart and your gums. Your health—general and oral—will appreciate it.

If you would like more information about gum health, please contact us or schedule a consultation.

By Elmvale Dental Care
January 03, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
3ThingsYouCanDotoProtectYourToothEnamel

Your teeth face a hostile environment populated by disease-causing bacteria. But your teeth also have some “armor” against these microscopic foes: enamel. This hard outer tooth layer forms a barrier between harmful bacteria and the tooth’s more vulnerable layers of dentin and the inner pulp.

But although it’s tough stuff, enamel can erode when it comes into contact with high concentrations of mouth acid. Losing substantial amounts of enamel could leave your teeth exposed to disease.

So, here are 3 things you can do to help protect your enamel so it can keep on protecting you.

Careful on the brushing. Brushing removes dental plaque, a thin bacterial film on teeth most responsible for dental disease. But be careful not to brush too often, too hard and too quickly after eating. Brushing more than twice a day can cause gum recession and enamel wear; likewise, brushing too aggressively. You should also wait at least 30 minutes after eating to brush to give your saliva sufficient time to neutralize any acid. You could lose tiny bits of softened enamel brushing too soon.

Cut back on acidic foods and beverages. Spicy foods, sodas and, yes, sports and energy drinks all contain high amounts of acid that can increase your mouth’s acidity. It’s a good idea, then, to reduce acidic foods and beverages in your diet. Instead, eat less spicy foods and drink primarily water or milk. Also, look for foods and beverages with calcium, which helps increase your enamel’s ability to remineralize after acid contact.

Don’t eat right before bedtime. There are a lot of reasons not to eat just before you hit the hay—and one of them is for protecting your tooth enamel. Saliva normally neutralizes acid within a half hour to an hour after eating. While you’re sleeping, though, saliva production decreases significantly. This in turn slows its neutralizing effect, giving acid more contact time with enamel. So, end your eating a few hours before you turn in to avoid too much acid remaining on your teeth.

If you would like more information on protecting your teeth and gums from dental disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Elmvale Dental Care
December 14, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
4FoodsThatAreGoodforBothYourMouthandYourBody

You can't separate your oral health from your overall health. What's beneficial for your body in general is usually beneficial for your teeth and gums.

Take the foods you eat: good nutrition is essential to general health and well-being. But the same foods that keep the rest of your body healthy often do the same for your mouth—and those that are not so good for the rest of you are usually not good for your teeth and gums either.

Here are 4 different types of foods that positively impact both mouth and body.

Cheese and dairy. Dairy products are rich in calcium, essential for strengthening both your bones and your teeth. Cheese helps stimulate saliva and protects against calcium loss. Cow's milk contains minerals and proteins both your body and mouth needs. It also contains lactose, a less acidic sugar that doesn't contribute to tooth decay.

Plant foods. Vegetables and fruit are loaded with vitamins and nutrients that keep the body functioning normally. They also contain fiber: Not only is this good for your digestive system, it requires chewing to break it down in the mouth, which stimulates saliva. A good flow of saliva helps prevent your mouth from becoming too acidic and thus more prone to dental disease.

Black and green teas. A nice cup of hot tea isn't just soothing—it's rich in antioxidants that help fight disease in the body (and the mouth). Black tea also contains fluoride, which has been proven to strengthen enamel against acid attack.

Chocolate. There's both good and bad news about this perennial favorite. The good news is the polyphenolic compounds (a kind of antioxidant) in unrefined cocoa can protect against disease including tooth decay. The bad news is most processed chocolate is loaded with added sugar—not the healthiest substance for your body, and definitely not for your teeth. Try then to incorporate small amounts of chocolate in your diet, the lower the sugar content the better.

Eating nutritiously helps your body stay healthy and disease-free. And coupled with daily hygiene and regular dental visits, it's one of the best things you can do for your teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on nutrition and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition and Oral Health: How Diet Impacts Dental and General Health.”

NationalFreshBreathDayRemindsUstoSeekOuttheSourceofBadBreath

Be sure to mark August 6 on your calendars—and not just because it's the day in 1661 when the Dutch sold Brazil to Portugal, or when President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in 1965, or when the Ramones performed for the last time in 1996. August 6 also happens to be National Fresh Breath Day! But since fresh breath is important to us every day, we like to celebrate all month long.

Celebrating fresh breath might not seem as noteworthy as these other historical moments, but if you're a frequent halitosis (bad breath) sufferer, you know it can be downright embarrassing. More importantly, it could be a sign of a deeper health problem. It turns out there are a number of reasons why you might have bad breath. Here are the most common.

You're not adequately cleaning your mouth. Certain strains of bacteria are known for emitting volatile sulfur compounds, which give rise to that "rotten egg" smell and are a major component of bad breath. Because they feed on leftover sugars and proteins from food, you can keep them and their noxious odors at bay by brushing and flossing your teeth and brushing the broad surface of the tongue, a prime breeding ground for these bacteria.

You're not producing enough saliva. This unsung bodily fluid is a key part of good oral health. Besides helping to rinse the mouth of food particles after eating, saliva also fights odor-causing bacteria. If your mouth is dry because you're not producing enough saliva, bacteria can grow and create a number of oral health problems, including bad breath. You may be able to relieve chronic dry mouth and accompanying bad breath by using saliva-boosting agents or drinking more water. You should also talk to your doctor about any medications you're taking that might interfere with saliva production.

It could be caused by disease. Tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease naturally give rise to bad breath—but so can other diseases like diabetes, cancer or respiratory infections. As you're dealing with these other conditions, you may also need to contend with bad breath as a side effect. You can help reduce any disease-based odors by keeping up your daily oral hygiene, especially if you're undergoing treatment for a systemic condition. Obtaining treatment, particularly if you have tooth decay or gum disease, will help reduce these embarrassing foul odors.

National Fresh Breath Day may not share the same pedestal with other momentous August dates, but if it reminds you to keep your mouth clean and see your dentist regularly, fresh breath certainly deserves its own day.

If you would like more information about the causes and remedies for bad breath, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing” and “Dry Mouth.”